Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/handle/10219/3123
Title: An analysis of primary and secondary sector employment in Canada in relation to the distribution of median income
Authors: St-George, Eric
Item Type: Thesis
Degree: Bachelor of Arts (Hons) in Geography
Keywords: employment activity;primary sector;secondary sector;ArcMap;mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction;agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting;manufacturing;national economy;Canada;local economies
Issue Date: 17-Apr-2018
Abstract: The Canadian economy continues to become more ‘advanced’ and is shifting towards more service jobs; tertiary, quaternary, and quinary. As a result, the Canadian job market now focusses less on direct resource and manufacturing employment. These changes are occurring in the context of globalization where productivity is continually being improved upon and higher education is greatly valued. This study addresses employment activity in the primary and secondary sector in Canada. This analysis is done to get a better understanding of the continued importance of these employment activities in a country that is focussing on more professional and service jobs. In order to analyze the primary and secondary sector in Canada, three variables have been used. The three variables are: 1) mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; 2) agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting; and 3) manufacturing. ArcMap has been used in this study to provide a visual representation of the spatial distribution of each of these three variables by according to a low, middle, and high range of industry activity. Locations in Canada that are categorized as low, middle and high in terms of industrial activity are also compared by median income. This research indicates that primary and secondary sector activity in Canada is still very important to the national economy as well as numerous local economies in Canada.
URI: https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/handle/10219/3123
Appears in Collections:Undergraduate Theses

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