Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/handle/10219/2578
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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Jennifer-
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-16T15:34:20Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-16T15:34:20Z-
dc.date.issued2015-11-12-
dc.identifier.urihttps://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/dspace/handle/10219/2578-
dc.description.abstractTimeliness is an important factor in the care of critically ill patients on the general wards in order to prevent an unplanned intensive care unit admission. The recognition of patient deterioration can be influenced by many factors. This study looks specifically at how communication, documentation and the recognition of patient deterioration affect unplanned intensive care unit admissions. Unplanned intensive care unit admissions may result in higher rate of mortality, longer lengths of stay and a prolonged recovery post discharge. The goal of this retrospective quantitative research study is to explore how communication, documentation and recognition of patient deterioration are utilized by nurses in order to help prevent an unplanned intensive care admission. This study was guided by the Nursing Role Effectiveness Model which considers how structures and processes lead to outcomes and has been utilized in many quality improvement initiatives. Communication, documentation and recognition of patient deterioration are key components that nurses can use to improve upon patient care. The benefits to preventing patient deterioration are clearly documented. Strengthening communication, documentation and recognition of patient deterioration skills will improve patient outcomes and in turn help to prevent the need for unplanned intensive care unit admissions.en_CA
dc.language.isoenen_CA
dc.subjectpatient deteriorationen_CA
dc.subjecturgenten_CA
dc.subjectunplanned intensive care unit admissionen_CA
dc.subjectNursing Role Effectiveness Modelen_CA
dc.titleNursing processes related to unplanned intensive care unit admissionsen_CA
dc.typeThesisen_CA
dc.description.degreeMasters of Science of Nursing (MScN)-
dc.publisher.grantorLaurentian University of Sudbury-
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses
Nursing / Science infirmière - Master's Theses

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