Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/handle/10219/2225
Title: Gendering social relations of work in the Canadian automotive industry: an autoethnographic study.
Authors: Starr, Meagan
Keywords: autoethnography;hegemonic masculinity;feminist political economy;embodied labour;automotive manufacturing industry;organizational theory
Issue Date: 15-Jul-2014
Publisher: Laurentian University of Sudbury
Abstract: This paper is an analysis of my gendered experiences working in the male-dominated industry of automotive manufacturing. My objective was to explore and critically analyze the gendered relations that I experienced while working in the contemporary automotive industry. Women working in male-dominated professions and environments often face circumstances that are unique to their male counterparts (Acker, 2006; Gottfried, 2013). The nature of the social relations affects women’s integration and potential success in male-dominated professions (Acker, 2006; Gottfried, 2013). The purpose of this research was to explore the challenges that I experienced as a woman working within a male-dominated profession. This was an exploratory qualitative study which was conducted through the method of autoethnography. An investigation and examination of my journal allowed for me to select important themes that represented the gender relations I experienced in the workplace. The main findings indicated that while working in male-dominated profession I experienced a host of challenges that were inherent in my work setting. The main challenges were as follows: 1) negotiating dominant forms of masculinity, 2) gender stereotyping/gender role expectations, 3) sexual harassment, and 4) the ways in which women’s bodies were considered suspect. I adopt several concepts/ideas from feminist political theoretical perspectives as well as other literature to analyze these themes. There were a variety of different concepts and theories that could assist in explaining why I was treated in an oppressive and dominating fashion. These concepts were as follows: 1) hegemonic masculinity, 2) gendered division of labour, 3) gendered hierarchies at work, and 4) embodied labour and bodies at work (Acker, 2006; Bakker & Gill, 2003; Bird, 1996; Connell, 1995; Gottfried, 2013).
URI: https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/dspace/handle/10219/2225
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses
Master's Theses

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