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Volume 2, April 1999: Applying Circles in Aboriginal Social Work Practice >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/dspace/handle/10219/462

Title: "Location and knowledge-building: Exploring the fit of western social work with traditional knowledge"
Authors: Zapf, Michael Kim
Issue Date: Apr-1999
Publisher: School of Native Human Services
Citation: Zapf, Michael, 2000. "Location and knowledge-building: Exploring the fit of western social work with traditional knowledge". NSWJ-V2, p. 138-152.
Abstract: In many regions of Canada, particularly the North, human services grounded in a Western social work model exist alongside Indigenous healing practices rooted in local traditional knowledge. For a long time, traditional knowledge was the only working knowledge base for survival in harsh northern climates. The relatively recent imposition of a Western scientific knowledge base has resulted in efforts to integrate or incorporate aspects of local traditional knowledge. Based on direct experience with this process within my own discipline of social work, I have attempted to explore issues of compatibility of the two knowledge systems with particular attention to the impact of place or spatial location.
URI: http://142.51.24.159/dspace/handle/10219/462
ISSN: 1206-5323
Appears in Collections:Volume 2, April 1999: Applying Circles in Aboriginal Social Work Practice

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