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Volume 5, November 2003: Articulating Aboriginal Paradigms: Implications for Aboriginal Social Work Practice >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/dspace/handle/10219/413

Title: "Honoring community: Development of a First Nations stream in social work"
Authors: Greenwood, Margo
Palmantier, Monty
Issue Date: Nov-2003
Publisher: School of Native Human Services
Citation: Greenwood, Margo, & Palmantier, Monty, 2003. "Honoring community: Development of a First Nations stream in social work". NSWJ-V5, p. 225-242.
Abstract: For the past 20 years First Nations leaders of northern British Columbia have been advocating for a Social Work program that would address the unique needs of First Nations communities. This is not surprising given the historical destruction of First Nations families and communities as a result of colonization. Many would argue that current child welfare practices continue on where residential schools left off in implementing government assimilation policies. Approximately 30% of all children in care in Canada are Aboriginal (Fournier and Crey, 1998). This is no different in British Columbia. In the northern half of the province the number of Aboriginal children in continuing care is as high as 80% (Children's Commission Annual Report, 1998). The need for culturally sensitive child welfare practices is critical to First Nations communities and families. With the opening of a new northern university in 1992, University of Northern British Columbia, there was a renewed hope by northern First Nations leaders for a Social Work program that would meet their needs as well as support their vision for a future of self sufficiency and independence. This paper describes one small step in that vision, that is, the development of First Nations Social Work courses. To better understand this development process it is first important to be aware of the context in which it was undertaken.
URI: http://142.51.24.159/dspace/handle/10219/413
ISSN: 1206-5323
Appears in Collections:Volume 5, November 2003: Articulating Aboriginal Paradigms: Implications for Aboriginal Social Work Practice

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