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Volume 7, November 2010: Promising Practices in Mental Health: Emerging Paradigms for Aboriginal Social Work Practices >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/dspace/handle/10219/386

Title: The Role of ‘Kijigabandan’ and ‘Manadjitowin’ in Understanding Harm Reduction Policies and Programs for Aboriginal Peoples
Authors: Dell, Colleen
Lyons, Tara
Cayer, Kathleen
Issue Date: Nov-2010
Citation: Dell, Colleen, Lyons, Tara, Cayer, Kathleen, "The Role of ‘Kijigabandan’ and ‘Manadjitowin’ in Understanding Harm Reduction Policies and Programs for Aboriginal Peoples". NSWJ-V7, p.109-137.
Abstract: Harm reduction policies and programs are gaining increasing acceptance as a promising practice to address high-risk substance use in Canada. A common premise of Western harm reduction initiatives is respect for substance users and their choices. An Aboriginal worldview extends this to understanding individuals, communities and their choices. This paper examines how the Algonquin concepts of ‘Kijigabandan’ and ‘Manadjitowin’ can be used to explore harm reduction’s value as a promising practice for Aboriginal social work. ‘Kijigabandan’ means to attempt to understand and develop personally from the process. ‘Manadjitowin’ means to honour someone or something once it is understood. This is a timely paper because at present there is no uniform starting place to address the value of harm reduction policies and programs as they relate to Aboriginal peoples.
URI: http://142.51.24.159/dspace/handle/10219/386
ISSN: 1206-5323
Appears in Collections:Volume 7, November 2010: Promising Practices in Mental Health: Emerging Paradigms for Aboriginal Social Work Practices

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